News

A second Eric & Flo

A second Eric & Flo

Translations: NL
The Eric & Flo is one of our most popular houses. A strikingly simple and timeless design, and also very powerful from every angle. In 2017 a Dutch client wanted a copy. Now an exact copy was not possible because of the Dutch building regulations and we had to raise the roof by a few centimeters. Also this client installed underfloor heating with a heatpump whereas the original Eric & Flo has no heated floor, not even heat-pump, just a wood burner… But other than that the house is almost identical.
Panel house in The Netherlands

Panel house in The Netherlands

Translations: NL
In 2016 we built a house in The Netherlands, but were too busy to put photographs on our website. Better late than never, so here are some photos of this house. Architects design (Edward van der Drift), 190 m2 footprint. This is when we had just handed over the house. The weather was terrible that summer but with some snow everything looks better. We placed bitumen on the roof, our client later added sedum for the green roof.
Ventilation in public buildings

Ventilation in public buildings

Translations: NL
Previously we wrote about “damp closed or damp tight buildings” and the fact that nowadays almost all utility buildings (offices, hospitals, airports, schools, …) are damp closed, i.e. moisture can not leave the building via the roof or the walls, or even via windows as often such building have no openable windows. Instead all air is refreshed via an air conditioning system that pre-heats incoming air using heat exchangers and heat pumps.
Loghouse in Denmark

Loghouse in Denmark

In 2020 we built a house in Denmark, close to Legoland. Appropriately our house was made from wooden logs that you stack together, not too dissimilar from plastic blocks that you stack together. These photos are far from perfect. Made with a phone, we forgot to bring our camera, sorry about that. This was nog a small house. We built it for a Dutch family that emigrated to Denmark some twenty years ago.
Riethoven log house

Riethoven log house

Translations: NL
In the South of The Netherlands we built the Riethoven house. Designed by the owner himself, this house is both a log house and a panel house: the ground floor is a log house, and then the second floor is a panel house, but constructed in such a way that you can not see the difference. If you would not know any better, you would think it is all logs. The panel construction gave us just that little extra flexibility to meet the demands.
Tour de France

Tour de France

About half our projects are in France, and as a result we travel through France regularly. And for tax purposes our accountant wants us to keep a log of our travels. No problem,we have an app that logs our whereabouts, every now and then it generates a file that keeps the accountant happy. Just for fun we placed the logs on a map. TomTom is our friend, except for those moments where it goes wrong, for instance when TomTom doesn’t know about this small river that we can not wade through.
Concrete pole foundations

Concrete pole foundations

Translations: NL
As for any other type of house, our wooden houses need a foundation. And foundations are a very local thing, in that the actual construction is very much dependant on the local conditions. In the Alps and the Pyrenees you need to drill away rocks until you have a flat surface. In The Netherlands everything is already flat, but usually soggy so that your house will sink and disappear in the mud.
Bigger crane

Bigger crane

Translations: NL
For panel houses we usually take a 10 ton-meter crane, that is: a crane that can lift one tonne over a 10 meter distance. Or 500 kilo’s over a 20 meter distance. For the average house with 6-meter panels that is just enough to lift panels from a truck, swing around and hoist the panel on the foundation. For an average house we need a crane for about three weeks.
Electricity box

Electricity box

Translations: NL
We were doing a hand-over inspection of a house that we had finished, and then we saw the electricity box. Very often these boxes are a little ehh… unorganized, to put it kindly. Apparantly the idea is: you close the door, you don’t see it, why bother. But this one was different. Done by an electrician with a little OCD. Very nice!
Yellow and blue log house

Yellow and blue log house

Translations: NL
With temperatures going down in Lithuania, and wind coming from the North-East, usually after a few days the Dutch go skating. And indeed, with Lithuanian temperatures going down to -25 Celcius, the ice started growing in The Netherlands and then the Dutch get into this frenzy where they all hope for the Great Event: the Elfstedentocht. And with Covid-19 the Dutch government did not want to let that happen, twenty thousand people on the ice was not a good idea, but also, they were reluctant to call off an event for which the Dutch had been waiting more than twenty years.
American barn

American barn

Translations: NL
Almost finished: an American barn. More to follow… In Almere in The Netherlands by the way, where something comparable, but bigger, has been built a couple of years ago: the “Rode Donders”.
Chalet Fifi in St. Jean d'Aulps

Chalet Fifi in St. Jean d'Aulps

Translations: NL
Last year we built a panel house in St. Jeans d’Aulps, about ten minutes from Morzine in France. And we promised to add some more photo. Here they are. It looks like a log house, but like many houses in the Alps it actually is a panel house. We also have photos from the interior and then the difference is more obvious. We will show you later. The style is very different from our Eric & Flo or the At & Alet, but this house totally fits in it’s environment.
New loghouse in Oosterwold

New loghouse in Oosterwold

Translations: NL
Just handed over to client: a new loghouse in Oosterwold, Netherlands. Inspired by the Eric & Flo, 120 m2 brutto surface.
Cold

Cold

Translations: NL
It is well known that timber from the North is heavier. It grows slower, and it is more dense. Better quality wood. We came back from a business meeting just South of Vilnius and when we drove through a forest, we made this short movie. Nice, made us think of slow growing pine. And then in the evening when we came back from work, we looked at the dashboard and saw the temperature…
Larch getting grey

Larch getting grey

Translations: NL
We often use larch on the facades of our houses, because it is very weather resistant. Doesn’t rot, needs no maintenance, protects your house for fifty years. But there is one thing about larch that is not to everybodies liking: it turns grey. Some people like the natural greying of larch, because it is natural. But others prefer to keep the original colours, for instance as in this house. We like the greying, but if you want to keep the original yellowish-orange tint of larch, then you must treat the facade with special products.
Eric & Flo

Eric & Flo

Translations: NL
The Eric & Flo still is, after eight years, the house for which we receive most requests. These photos we received today from our clients in the Lozère. Winter wonderland with a beautiful house…
Wooden logs and cracks

Wooden logs and cracks

Translations: NL
Log houses and cracks Log houses are built from wooden logs, that is: solid or laminated wooden beams, from eight centimeters thick upto thirty centimeters thick. We usually build our walls twelve or sixteen centimeters thick. Twelve is more than enough for a two-level house, but if you got money to spare then sixteen or twenty centimeters just looks nice. Otherwise there is little difference. But what about cracks?
St. Jean d'Aulps

St. Jean d'Aulps

Translations: NL
When we rebuild our website we lost quite some content. A post about a house that we built last year in St. Jean d’Aulps (just 10 minutes North of Morzine) also disappeared in cyberspace, so now we place it again. Although it looks like a log house, this actually is a panel house. We built the wooden part, a local contractor did the concrete foundation (but we supplied the windows that went into the concrete part).
Unloading in the rain, again

Unloading in the rain, again

Translations: NL
And another photo of unloading, and this time the rain had just stopped. Our client watched while we were busy with panels and trucks and a crane, and she took a photo. Look at the reflection. You don’t need a fancy camera to see the beauty of reflections.
Unloading in the rain

Unloading in the rain

Translations: NL
Right after we wrote something about building sites and mud, we start with another project in the polder. And guess what… rain with the first truck. At least we got some nice photos, taken by our client. Our men were less enthousiastic. Minus twenty degrees Celcius is ok for them, but water… At least next week will be better.